Candlestick Patterns Graph

 

One advantage is that in Forex candlestick charts, candles are colored accordingly to the direction of price movement: when the open rate is higher than the closing rate the candlestick is colored with a “filled-in” body, and when the candlestick shows a “hollow” body, that means the closing rate exceeds the opening rate. The body of the .

You must be aware of the risks and be willing to accept them in order to invest in the futures and options markets. Not all instruments metals and CFDs in particular are available in all regions. A hammer pictorially displays that the market opened near its high, sold off during the session, then rallied sharply to close well above the extreme low. The truth is that continuation candle patterns are not very popular in Forex trading.

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One advantage is that in Forex candlestick charts, candles are colored accordingly to the direction of price movement: when the open rate is higher than the closing rate the candlestick is colored with a “filled-in” body, and when the candlestick shows a “hollow” body, that means the closing rate exceeds the opening rate. The body of the .

In a quick view, you notice in which direction, if any, the price is heading. This is just one of the multiple conventions and the one we will use here, as each charting service may color the bullish and bearish candles differently.

Below is an example of candlesticks and a definition for each candlestick component. The solid part is the body of the candlestick. The lines at the top and bottom are the upper and lower wicks, also called tails or shadows. The very peak of a candle's wick is the highest price for that time period, while the bottom of the wick is the lowest price for that particular time period. Another advantage of using a candlestick chart is that you may combine them with conventional market indicators such as moving averages and trendlines.

But the most outstanding advantage these charts offer are the early warning signs when changes in trends occur. Some traders seem put off by the language that surrounds candlestick charts. But it's quite simple actually: Originally, candlestick formations were labeled accordingly, in part, to the military environment of the Japanese feudal system during that time.

Steve Nison, in one of his books about the topic, explains: A fascinating attribute to candle charts is that the names of the candlestick patterns are a colorful mechanism describing the emotional health of the market at the time these patterns are formed.

Without knowing what these patterns look like or what they imply for the market, just by hearing their names, which do you think is bullish and which is bearish? The evening star the nickname for the planet Venus , which comes out before darkness sets in, sounds like the bearish signal - and so it is! The morning star, then, is bullish since the morning start the planet Mercury appears just before sunrise. Out of a universe of dozens of candlestick patterns, it has been found that a small group of them provide more trade opportunities than most traders will be able to utilize.

In this section, 12 patterns are dissected and studied, with the intention to offer you enough insight into a fascinating way to read price action. The following is a list of the selected candlestick patterns. Although this candle is not one of the most mentioned ones, it's a good starting point to differentiate long candles from short candles. A marubozu is a single candlestick pattern which has a very long body compared to other candles. Although this is considered a confirmation of the market's direction, it suggests to enter the move when the price has already moved a lot.

The resulting risk associated with this signal makes the marubozu not so popular compared to other candlesticks. It signals a strong buying when the close is significantly above the open, and vice versa when the candle is bearish. A short candle is of course just the opposite and usually indicates slowdown and consolidation. It occurs when trading has been confined to a narrow price range during the time span of the candle. The smaller the real body of the candle is, the less importance is given to its color whether it is bullish or bearish.

Notice how the marubozu is represented by a long body candlestick that doesn't contain any shadows. Despite the odds of a market turn increasing with a doji, it still lacks a confirmation to be traded upon.

Doji's are formed when the session opens and closes at the same level. This pattern indicates there is a lot of indecision about what should be the value of a currency pair. Depending on the shape of the shadows, dojis can be divided into different formations:. A long legged doji candlestick forms when the open and close prices are equal. The dragonfly doji shows a session with a high opening price , which then experiences a notable decline until a renewed demand brings the price back to finish the session at the same price at which it opened.

At the top of a trend, it becomes a variation of the hanging man; and at the bottom of a trend, it becomes a kind of hammer. It is thus seen as a bullish signal rather than neutral.

The gravestone doji's are the opposite of the dragonfly doji. Appropriately named, they are supposed to forecast losses for the base currency, because any gain is lost by the session's end, a sure sign of weakness. The Japanese analogy is that it represents those who have died in battle.

Dragonfly and gravestone dojis are two general exceptions to the assertion that dojis by themselves are neutral. In most Candle books you will see the dojis with a gap down or up in relation to the previous session. In Forex, nonetheless, the dojis will look a bit different as shown in the picture below.

How can I deal with the fact that different charting platforms show different candlestick patterns because of their time zone? Forex market, we would suggest to use a GMT chart since most institutional volume is handled in London. This is specially valid if you work with daily charts but intraday charts superior to 1 hour will also show differences in the patterns.

In any case, because of the 24 hour nature of the Forex market, the candlestick interpretation demands a certain flexibility and adaptation.

You will see how some of the textbook patterns look slightly different in Forex than in other markets. The following patterns are thought to alert the trained eye of pending reversals offering the chance to the trader to get early on a possible new trend, or to alert the trader who is already in the money that the trend is ending and the position demand to be managed.

Irrespective of what you trade though, you really do need to know what you are doing from the very start, or you will likely end up losing more than you ever set out to in the first place. For some people education begins officially in a classroom, which is by far the best possible start you could have. The majority though, pick up some books and read some articles on the Internet much like this, before they take their education any further. There is an old phrase in trading: I also prefer the candle itself to be larger than the previous candle.

There are few patterns where the shadows play a major role than the body. One of these are hammers , which is comprised of one single candle. It is called so because the Japanese will say the market is trying to hammer out a base. A hammer pictorially displays that the market opened near its high, sold off during the session, then rallied sharply to close well above the extreme low. Note it can close slightly above or below the open price, in both cases it would fulfill the criteria.

Because of this strong demand at the bottom, it is considered a bottom reversal signal. A perfect hammer in Forex is the same as in any other market: This means it can have a little upper shadow, but it has to be much smaller than the lower shadow.

The smaller the body and the longer the tail, the more significant the interpretation of the hammer as a bullish signal. Another important criteria is the color of the body: Most patterns have some flexibility so much more illustrations would be required to show all the possible variations. This is what we attempt to do in the Practice Chapter. The illustration below is a sample question taken from the Practice Chapter's assessment.

There you will find dozens of real case studies to interpret and answer. Each example will show a detailed explanation of the correct answer so that you can really integrate this knowledge in your trading. A way to look at the prices 2. Common Candlestick Terminology 2. Dark Cloud Cover 2. News, Analysis and Education Reports on Candlesticks.

Analytical Tools A chart is primarily a graphical display of price information over time. Technical indicators and trendlines can be added to it in order to decide on entrance and exit points, and at what prices to place stops. All these charts can also be displayed on an arithmetic or logarithmic scale. The types of charts and the scale used depends on what information the technical analyst considers to be the most important, and which charts and which scale best shows that information.

If your interest is a qualitative view of the market, because you want to display data that have had a large percentage of increase or decrease in price, usually longer-term charts, then it is more appropriate to use a logarithmic chart.

While the arithmetic shows price changes in time, the logarithmic displays the proportional change in price - very useful to observe market sentiment. You can know the percentage change of price over a period of time and compare it to past changes in price, in order to assess how bullish or bearish market participants feel. However, in the Forex market, the arithmetic scale is the most appropriate chart to use because the market doesn't show large percentage increases or decreases in the exchange rates.

On an arithmetic chart equal vertical distances represent equal price ranges - seen usually by means of a grid in the background of a chart. The arithmetic scale is also the most appropriate to apply technical analysis tools and detect chartist patterns because of its quantitative nature.

Besides the arithmetic scale, the Forex world has also adopted the Japanese candlestick charts as a medium to access a quantitative as well as a qualitative view of the market. Traditionally the Japanese attribute yang qualities expansion to bullish candles and yin qualities contraction to bearish candles. When the yang reaches an extreme there is stillness, and stillness gives rise to yin. A reversal in market forces follows the same principle: This balance between ying and yang forces is another way to look at swing movements in price similar to the wave principles covered in the previous chapter B Candles can be used across all time frames — from intraday to monthly charts.

For example, on a weekly chart, an individual candle line would be composed of Monday's open, Friday's close and the high and low of the week; while a four hour candle would comprise the same price levels for that time period.

Marubozu candlestick Although this candle is not one of the most mentioned ones, it's a good starting point to differentiate long candles from short candles. The doji also means the market has gone from a yang or ying quality to neutral state. In western terms it is said that the trend has slowed down - but it doesn't mean an immediate reversal! I have shown the bullish and the bearish version of each candle.

The meaning is the same. The first candle on the sketch is the Hammer candlestick chart pattern. The candle emerges during bearish trends and signalizes that a bullish move is probably on its way. The Hammer candle has a small body, a long lower shadow and a very small or no upper shadow.

Traders use the Hammer candlestick to open long trades. The Inverted Hammer candle has absolutely the same functions as the Hammer candle, but it is upside down. The Inverted Hammer has a small body, a big upper shadow, and a small or no lower shadow. Same as the Hammer candle, the Inverted Hammer candlestick comes after bearish moves and signalizes that a fresh bullish move might be emerging.

Traders use the Inverted Hammer pattern to open long trades. The Hanging Man candlestick is absolutely the same as the Hammer candlestick pattern. It has a small body, a long lower shadow and a very small or no upper shadow.

However, the Hanging Man Forex pattern occurs after bullish trends and signalizes that the trend is reversing. As a result, the Hanging Man candle pattern is used by traders to open short trades. The Shooting Star candle pattern has the same structure as the Inverted Hammer candle. It has a small body, a long upper shadow and a tiny or no lower shadow.

However, the Shooting Star Forex candle comes after bullish trends and signalizes that the bulls are exhausted. As a result, a reversal and a fresh price decrease usually appear afterward. Therefore, Shooting Star candlestick chart patterns act as a signal to short Forex pairs.

The confirmation of the Hammer, Inverted Hammer, the Shooting Star and the Hanging Man comes with the candle which closes in the direction opposite to the trend. This candle is likely to be the first of an eventual emerging trend. The Three Inside Up is another reversal candle pattern indicator that comes after bearish trends and foretells fresh bullish moves. It is a triple Forex candlestick pattern that starts with a bearish candle. The pattern continues with a bullish candle, which is fully engulfed by the fist candle, and which closes somewhere in the middle of the first candle.

The pattern ends with a third candle, which is bullish and breaks the top of the first candle. The first candle of the Three Inside Up candle pattern is usually the last candle of the previous bearish trend. It comes after bullish trends and usually begins fresh bearish moves. The Three Inside Down candlestick pattern starts with a bullish candle, which is usually the last of the previous bullish trend.

The pattern continues with a second candle — a bearish one that is fully engulfed by the first candle and closes somewhere in the middle of the first candle. The pattern then continues with a third candle, which is bearish and goes below the beginning of the first candle. The confirmation of the Three Inside Up and the Three Inside Down candlestick patterns comes with the third candle that closes beyond the beginning of the first candle of the pattern. The Morning Star candle pattern is another three-bar formation that has reversal functions.

The Morning Star candlestick chart pattern comes after bullish trends and signals an eventual price reversal. The pattern starts with a bullish candle that is long, and it is usually the last candle of the previous bullish trend.

Then it continues with a very small candle that could sometimes even be a Doji star, and it is possible that this candle sometimes gaps up. The third candle of the pattern is bearish and goes below the middle point of the first candle, and it could also gap down from the second candle.

The Evening Star Forex figure is a mirror version of the Morning Star that comes after bearish trends and signals their reversal. The Evening Star candle pattern starts with a bearish candle that is long, and it is usually the last candle of the previous bearish trend. Then it continues with a very small candle that could sometimes even be a Doji star, and it is possible that this candle sometimes gaps down.

The third candle of the pattern is bullish and goes above the middle point of the first candle of the pattern. It could also gap up from the second candle.

The confirmation of the Morning Star and the Evening Star candlestick reversal patterns comes with the end of the third candle. If the pattern emerges meeting the requirements of the three candles, then you can trade in the respective direction. I have created a simple candlestick pattern cheat sheet for your convenience.

It contains all the sketches shown above. You can use these Forex candlestick patterns for day trading by simply peeking at the cheat sheet to confirm the patterns. Save the image on your PC, or simply print it for your convenience. Now that you are familiar with the structure of the best candlestick patterns for intraday trading, I suggest that we go through a couple of chart examples of how these work in trading.

The first example on the chart shows the Three Inside Up and the Three Inside Down chart pattern indicators in action. Notice that after each of these two patterns the price action creates a turning point and the price reverses the previous trend. You should place your Stop Loss orders at the opposite side of the patterns as shown in the image. This is a Tweezer Bottoms Forex candle pattern. Noticethat the lower shadows of the two candles start and end approximately at the same level, which confirms the validity of the pattern.

As a result, the price action reverses, which triggers a long trade. At the same time, you should put a stop loss order below the lowest point of the pattern. Both patterns have the ability to end a bullish trend and to start a fresh bearish move. You should approach both patterns with a short trade, and you should sell upon their confirmation, placing Stop Loss orders above their high.

As you see, in both cases the price decreases after the confirmation of the pattern. Lastly, we will discuss a Doji candlestick pattern that comes after a bearish trend. Our Doji candlestick analysis shows that the price ends the bearish move and starts a fresh bullish move. You should trade in bullish direction here, placing a Stop Loss order below the lowest point of the Doji star candle. You should always use a Stop Loss order when trading Forex candlestick patterns.