112 results

 


The Marlin Model 99 was developed in by Ewald Nichol. Even California and Massachusetts permit the Model 60, despite its more than 10 round tubular magazine. Any Model 60 cycles fast, as fast as you can pull the trigger. Model 60 variations have also been stamped with private label names and sold by mass merchandisers such as J.

Navigation menu


Produced by the Remington Arms of Mayfield, Kentucky formally by Marlin Firearms Company of North Haven, Connecticut, it has been in continuous production since and the company claims it is the most popular of its kind in the world.

The Marlin Model 99 was developed in by Ewald Nichol. Internally, it was essentially what would become the Model 60 in However, major differences were visible from the exterior. The Model 99 featured a walnut stock, and the receiver, instead of being grooved for tip-off scope mounts like the Model 60 would be, was factory-tapped to accept screw-on scope mounts.

The Model 99 was offered from through , and a lower priced version, Model 99G, was offered under Marlin's Glenfield line. The Marlin Model 60 was developed in from the Model 99 design. The primary difference was that the stock was made of birch instead of walnut to reduce the recurring production costs for the more expensive wood. Marlin also moved away from their practice of using steel inner tubes with their tubular magazine.

They moved back to brass inner tubes as other companies had done. This, instead of the steel tubes often seen on earlier Marlin. The Model 60 additionally featured a groove rifled barrel, utilizing Marlin's trademarked Micro-Groove rifling technology, which had been developed in This rifling, with its precision-crowned muzzle, gave the Model 60 an inherent, enhanced accuracy over competing rifles, which used traditional deep grooved rifling, because the bullet was not as severely deformed while traveling down the barrel, and downrange.

Internally, it was essentially what would become the Model 60 in However, major differences were visible from the exterior. The Model 99 featured a walnut stock, and the receiver, instead of being grooved for tip-off scope mounts like the Model 60 would be, was factory-tapped to accept screw-on scope mounts.

The Model 99 was offered from through , and a lower priced version, Model 99G, was offered under Marlin's Glenfield line. The Marlin Model 60 was developed in from the Model 99 design. The primary difference was that the stock was made of birch instead of walnut to reduce the recurring production costs for the more expensive wood.

Marlin also moved away from their practice of using steel inner tubes with their tubular magazine. They moved back to brass inner tubes as other companies had done. This, instead of the steel tubes often seen on earlier Marlin. The Model 60 additionally featured a groove rifled barrel, utilizing Marlin's trademarked Micro-Groove rifling technology, which had been developed in This rifling, with its precision-crowned muzzle, gave the Model 60 an inherent, enhanced accuracy over competing rifles, which used traditional deep grooved rifling, because the bullet was not as severely deformed while traveling down the barrel, and downrange.

The Model 60 has a manual "fully open" bolt hold position, activated by pushing the charging handle inwards towards the gun when it is in the fully retracted, open breech position.

To close the bolt with the manual bolt hold-open engaged, the charging handle must be pulled out, away from the gun, before the bolt will go forward. Since , the Model 60 has also included a patented automatic "last-shot" bolt hold-open. This latter feature is a safety feature that locks the bolt half-way open after the last cartridge is fired, thereby allowing the safe inspection of the now-open action.

This also notifies the user when the gun is empty. During the lates, the capacity of the rifle was reduced to a round maximum limit, to meet New Jersey's firearms law for semi-automatic assault weapons. For a few years in the mids the Model 60 rifles had both the "last shot hold open" feature and also held 18 rounds in the tube magazine. Those rifles with those two features are among the most sought after Model 60s.

The redesigned magazine tube was visibly shorter than the barrel, which is how rifles from this period can be easily identified. The lethality for self-defense purposes is very limited.

A double-tap to the body might not stop a determined aggressor. Also, inside of a house, a handgun is probably preferable. A rifle can more easily be grabbed by an attacker, and the one or two shots you get off before that happens might not be enough.

But the tubular magazine does not allow for fast reloads. For hunting small game, a 22 rifle is one of your best choices. But you simply do not have the option of hunting anything larger. The AR platform can be used to hunt medium game. By comparison to a shotgun, the 22 is better for small game, and offers less noise and recoil. But the shotgun far exceeds the 22 in self-defense lethality, and in hunting a wider range of game. The shotgun might be a little more expensive for the gun, but it is much more expensive for the ammo although you probably need less of the shotgun ammo.

Any good 22 rifle is an inexpensive and highly useful gun for prepping purposes. The Marlin Model 60 is among the top choices of guns in that category. My opinion is that, for all its benefits and limitations, the gun is worth every penny. Buy and store some quality 22lr ammo, and you will have a great resource to use in many different situations. Good review on the Marlin, a quick way to reload any tube mag is something I learned many years ago is to make a speed loader out of a plastic drinking straw.

These fit just inside of the tube and hold 7 rounds. Crimp one end with a staple, secure with elec. Once loaded use plain tape to cover loading end. You can buy a commercial plastic bulk loader but they are bulky and straws are free.

I have 20 firearms with my most recent being a Marlin 60SN synthetic stock. I really recommend it. I added a sling and scope, but Marlin has an option of rifle that comes with a scope mounted on it. Is the Marlin Model 60 a good prepping gun? Posted on Wednesday, November 28, by Thoreau 3 Comments. Pros of the Marlin Model 60 At 5. Cons of the Marlin Model 60 There are substantial cons to the Model 60, from a prepping point of view.

Verdict Any good 22 rifle is an inexpensive and highly useful gun for prepping purposes. This entry was posted in guns. RGR Thursday, November 29, at 5: